Fugitives from Fundamentalism

The Musings of Adult Missionary Kids (MKs) & Former Born-Again Believers

Church bells ringing

Posted by Paulo on March 5, 2009

nietzsche1When on a Sunday morning we hear the bells ringing, we ask ourselves: is it possible? This is going on because of a Jew crucified 2,000 years ago who said he was the son of God. The proof of such an assertion is lacking. In the context of our age the Christian religion is certainly a piece of antiquity intruding out of distant ages past, and that the above-mentioned assertion is believed is perhaps the most ancient piece of the inheritance. A god who begets children on a mortal woman; a sage who calls upon us no longer to work, no longer to sit in judgment, but to heed the signs of the imminent end of the world; a justice which accepts an innocent man as a substitute sacrifice; someone who bids his disciples drink his blood; prayers for miraculous interventions; sins perpetrated against a god atoned for by a god; fear of a Beyond to which death is the gateway; the figure of the Cross as a symbol in an age which no longer knows the meaning and shame of the Cross–how gruesomely all this is wafted to us, as if out of the grave of a primeval past! Can one believe that things of this sort are still believed in?

– Friedrich Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human

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2 Responses to “Church bells ringing”

  1. The Chaplain said

    Good quote. It reminds me of the times I have had Christians quote Nietzsche to me in attempts to make a point about the dangers of not believing in their ancient superstitions. Nietzsche is not easily understood.

    In “A Fish Called Wanda,” Kevin Kline tells Jamie Lee Curtis “well apes don’t read Nietzsche!”
    and Curtis responds with “Yes they do, Otto, they just don’t understand it.”

  2. Ann said

    Nobody is very likely to consider a doctrine true merely because it makes people happy or virtuous–except perhaps the lovely “idealists” who become effusive about the good, the true, and the beautiful and allow all kinds of motley, clumsy, and benevolent desiderata to swim around in utter confusion in their pond. Happiness and virtue are no arguments. But people like to forget–even sober spirits–that making unhappy and evil are no counterarguments. Something might be true while being harmful and dangerous in the highest degree. Indeed, it might be a basic characteristic of existence that those who would know it completely would perish, in which case the strength of a spirit should be measured according to how much of the “truth” one could still barely endure–or to put it more clearly, to what degree one would require it to be thinned down, shrouded, sweetened, blunted, falsified.

    -Friedrich Nietzsche, Beyond Good & Evil

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